The Disaster Artist pays homage to The Room

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The Disaster Artist pays homage to The Room

Photo courtesy of Justina Mintz

Photo courtesy of Justina Mintz

Photo courtesy of Justina Mintz

Nathan Chapeton, Staff Writer

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On June 13, 1998, in an acting
class in San Francisco, Greg
Sestero, a young man fresh out
of high school, was fascinated
by another actor’s loud performance
of a Shakespearean
sonnet. This fearless actor is the
one and only Tommy Wiseau,
a mysterious man with an
ambiguous background and a
weird accent. Blown away by the
extremely odd Mr. Wiseau, Greg
decides that he has to do a scene
with him to learn more about
him. A year later, Tommy and
Greg are the best of friends,
bonded by their love of acting
and movies. This seemingly
benign friendship will soon lead
to the making of the most disastrous
movie ever: The Room.
Anyone who knows anything
about movies has heard about
The Room, one of the most
important pieces of visual literature
from the 21st century. It
is a complex and riveting story
about a successful banker who
is betrayed when his fiancee
Lisa has an affair with his best
friend Mark. Its release completely
baffled audiences all
over the world. The expendable
side plots and character mood
swings are as entertaining as
they are confusing. The amount
of mistakes made in this film
are so astounding that they become
impossible to overlook.
One IMDB critic went far
enough to say, “ [The Room] is
like being stabbed in the head,”
(Carstair, R. 2003, June 28). The
Room is so terrible and bizarre
that it quickly gained a cult
following. Fifteen years later,
this film is considered by many
to be the best worst movie of
all time. Dedicated fans have
even created active traditions
while watching The Room. For
example, the set of the house
has several pictures of spoons
(which to most people, is quite
out of the ordinary). This
peculiarity caused a fan to throw
a spoon at the screen whenever
the spoons showed up, consequently
making it a tradition to
this day.
So, how exactly was the The
Room made? Who let all these
absurdities happen while filming?
Fortunately, in 2013 Greg
Sestero wrote a book detailing
the story behind The Room: The
Disaster Artist. The book tells
how he met Tommy Wiseau and
what exactly happened behind
the scenes.
The book has a compelling
story and it quickly caught the
attention of actor and director
James Franco. In February of
2014, Seth Rogen announced
that the Point Grey production
company, owned by Rogen,
had obtained the books’ rights.
James Franco was set to direct
and star as Tommy Wiseau in
this film about the production
of The Room. Three years later,
The Disaster Artist was released.
The Disaster Artist has a lot going
for it, including several great
actors, an opportunity for James
Franco to redeem himself as a
director, and most importantly,
the source material. This is also
the first movie that James and
Dave Franco star in together.
However, when the trailer for
this movie came out, many
people were skeptical about
whether the film could give the
proper homage that The Room
deserves.
Fortunately, The Disaster Artist
with a solid story structure
and well-thought-out pacing,
does not disappoint. The setup
between Tommy Wiseau and
Greg Sestero is amusing, and
the chemistry that they have in
the film is truly touching. James
Franco is incredible in his imitation
of Tommy Wiseau, and it
doesn’t take long to forget that
Tommy is just James Franco in
a wig.
The movie understood The
Room very well, specifically what
the film meant to Tommy and
By NATHAN CHAPETON
Staff Writer
By SANTIAGO GONZALEZ
Staff Writer
Greg. It showcases their determination
to follow their dreams
and what it takes to do something
when everyone is against
you. In addition to the themes
it delves into, The Disaster Artist
takes its time recreating how
and why certain scenes were
filmed. An example of this is
the infamous line, “It’s bullsh*t,
I did not hit her! I did noooot!
Oh hi, Mark.” The process that
it took to film this line is much
more interesting than just the
10-second clip of Tommy saying
it.
The Disaster Artist features
great performances and celebrity
cameos that will make
audience members laugh. Brett
Gelman, the paranoid investigator
from the second season
of Stranger Things, appears as
one of the unimpressed acting
teachers in the beginning and
Breaking Bad’s Bob Odenkirk
also appears in the film. The
strangest cameo, however, is
made by Josh Hutcherson in
a very impressive wig. Despite
Zac Efron’s somewhat lengthy
appearance in the film, he
looks so different that audience
members will be unsure of his
identity throughout.
In the end, The Disaster Artist
teaches viewers that friendships
can overcome difficulties
in life and that determination
does not equate automatic talent.
The story of Tommy and
Greg is truly touching and will
bring inspiration to anyone who
dreams big

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