Blue Prints

Desire to eat Tide pods sweeps the internet

Bryjae Bembry and Gabriella Cafarelli

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Tide pods: laundry detergent
or a yummy snack? Until a few
weeks ago, this would be an easy,
and seemingly odd, question to
answer. Social media and memes
have impacted the world in which
we live. What originally started as
a funny joke has become an extremely
dangerous internet challenge.
Like the cinnamon challenge,
this challenge poses a huge
health risk to those who attempt
it. Both challenges are pointless
and were not thought out whatsoever.

Before people actually began
eating tide pods, tide pods were
naturally used for laundry. Then,
a meme began to spread like
wildfire about how the tide pods
look like candy. Posts originally
posted on Twitter from satirical
accounts quickly garnered a large
number of likes and retweets.
From there, people began to
post more and more about how
delicious tide pods look, which
led to fake “meals” made with
tide pods. “People are eating tide
pods because there was a meme
where a guy made a pizza with
tide pods,” said Daniel Olerud,
a junior, “which spread across
social media and now people are
making videos of them eating
tide pods. I guess they think it is
funny or something. It isn’t really
funny.” In agreement, teacher
Kathy Adams said, “These kids
should know not to eat tide pods,
even if they do look kinda delicious.”

The tide pod challenge is an internet
challenge in which people
record themselves biting into
or eating a tide pod and then
they upload it to their social
media, most popularly, Twitter.
What is the benefit? Unlike
the ice bucket challenge, which
raised money and awareness for
ALS, the only benefits of the
Tide Pod Challenge are likes,
shares, views and followers.
“There is beauty and danger in
trends in today’s society,” said PE
teacher Matthew Harris, “This
tide pod situation is very dangerous,
but if we think back to
the ALS ice bucket challenge,
that was a great way to raise
money. Kids need to be very
careful.”
These “tide pod-eating” social
media sensations are not receiving
the response they had assumed
they would have received.
From this, people are posting
how tide pod challenge is “natural
selection.” J u n i o r
Chris Boller similarly
stated, “These
people are stupid for
eating tide pods. It
started as a funny joke
and now people are eating
them, kind of ruined the
meme.”
This shows just how a simple
meme can turn into a craze between
teenagers and even adults.
Spanish teacher Meredith Walters
stated, “It’s all ridiculous!
It’s also a waste of
money, these things
are expensive, it’s
more of an indication of
deeper cultural problems.”
What started as a funny
meme, has become an
ironic joke. Of course,
the funniness of the joke
has changed. Senior Cameron
Moskey said, “It’s
the same level as the cinnamon
challenge, some
people don’t realize that
others are just joking and
now this is real but why
don’t people have common
sense to not eat a
tide pod?” One would
think so since memes
usually stay memes and
do not typically turn into
a life-risking “tide pod epidemic.”

People should have the common
sense, especially in modern
America with such advanced science
and technology, to not eat
laundry detergent.
Little do these tide pod-eating
teenagers know, there are some
ingredients to tide pods that literally
stick to metal. Think about
what this may do inside your
body! Researchers say that eating
a tide pod is much worse than actually
drinking detergent because
tide pods are highly concentrated
with soap, which is poisonous to
the body. “It is not healthy. That’s
all,” said sophomore Kalen Martin.

But some teens just are not
that wise. History teacher Lee
Rocha claimed, “I see no benefit
in being a follower even if I was
a teenager right now, it would just
be stupid.” Clearly, this is a more
modern trend to happen. During
other eras, there may have been
trends, but not as widely spread
or popular as now.
“I think it is interesting,” said
Sarah Canfield, a junior, “because
what possesses someone to eat
tide pods, and how?” Seemingly,
the only answer is that it is a trend
which has influenced people to
do dangerous things in order to
be a “social media sensation.”
Hopefully, this challenge is just
a fad and will not continue to
put people in danger. Of course,
there will be other challenges
created over time that will put
people at risk, so let’s all be wise
and not put ourselves in danger
for likes and followers.

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Desire to eat Tide pods sweeps the internet