Venom surprises after poor critic ratings

Back to Article
Back to Article

Venom surprises after poor critic ratings

Photo courtesy of www.cnet.com

Photo courtesy of www.cnet.com

Photo courtesy of www.cnet.com

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Despite poor ratings by critics, many fans enjoyed the movie Venom.

The action scenes were suspenseful and dramatic, while also maintaining fast paced intense moments. The music was always spot on and gave the scenes a fitting sense of excitement. The witty banter between characters, for example between Venom and Eddie, kept audiences engaged and entertained.

While it did have many good qualities and was thoroughly enjoyable, I do agree that the movie was not perfect.

The first half was better put together than the second and the character development was subpar at best. For example, at a glance, Eddie Brock’s ex-girlfriend dislikes him for his behavior and conniving ways and yet is suddenly worried for his health the moment something is amiss.

There is also a major plot hole that is never touched upon. About half way through the movie we find out that the lead character has a fatal heart condition and could only survive if he was linked with the symbiote. However, this factor is never revisited or even mentioned by any other character for the rest of the film, resulting in it seeming oddly disconnected from the rest of the film for such a defining turning point for the main character.

Despite these flaws, audiences were still pleasantly surprised by the movie since it was in complete contrast to many critics’ reviews. For example, an audience review from Lee H on Rotten Tomatoes reads, “I’d gone into the cinema bracing for the hot mess described by the critics yet left with a big smile on my face.” Many didn’t understand why the critic score is so low. While a handful of improvements could have been made, many audience members went into the movie bracing for a movie reflecting the critics low scores, however, came out loving almost every minute of it.

It is a mistake to go into the movie believing it is a typical super-hero film. Unlike most movies of this type, Venom is neither a hero’s nor a villain’s story. Venom is a parasite which formed a symbiotic relationship with a human, thus he lacks the motive to be a villain nor the passion and drive to be a hero. Rather, Venom is portrayed as an anti-villain, and his character is a chaotic good. Because of this defining factor, I disagree with Glenn Kelly, of the New York Times, who said, “the ingratiating eccentricities of Venom aren’t enough to really distinguish the movie from its superhero-movie brethren.”

Contrary to popular belief, Venom is also not a Marvel movie, but rather a Sony movie. It was directed, cast, and produced by Sony development teams. However, due to a contract Sony made with Marvel in the new MCU’s Spider-Man Homecoming, confusion was caused by Marvel’s help with branding, special effects, and marketing. Some critics were ultimately let down by their own false belief that Venom was a Marvel movie. For example, the first sentence in Peter Travers review from The Rolling Stones magazine began “In the first scene of Marvel’s utterly unmarvelous Venom…” This shows how little certain critics understand of the dynamics between the two power house film companies and the way Venom was shaped.

As an avid comic book fan, I loved the Venom movie,because it not only introduced the main character in a strong way, but it also introduced other characters and events from the comics that I loved. It left me excited to see what, if at all, they do with Venom and the other symbiotes next.

My only words of caution for someone considering watching the movie Venom are for those who have never read a Spiderman, Venom, or Marvel comic. You may have trouble understanding the characters or their dynamics without background knowledge.

As a movie in general, Venom is thoroughly enjoyable, from the music to the special effects, despite low ratings from critics.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email